Changelog: New-SignedScript

This is the changelog page for New-SignedScript. You will find a complete list of released versions, their dates, and the features and issues addressed in each. Please refer to the script’s main page for more information including download links, installation details, and more.

v1.1 – 06-10-2012

  1. Better handling when there is more than one code signing cert. Script now finds the first valid code signing cert and uses that.
  2. Better validation that the script is successfully signed

v1.0 – 09-20-2012

  1. Initial version
Categories: PowerShell Tags: , ,

Script: Get-CsFederatedConversationDetails.ps1 – See Stats About Conversations With Specific Federated Domains

May 13, 2014 9 comments

Lync 2013 logo 128x128Description

Richard Schwendiman, PFE at Microsoft, came up with a great SQL query that you could plug into SQL Server Management Studio to see time & date info for conversations with federated or PIC domains. In Richard’s case, he used the aol.com PIC domain. Since PIC federation with AOL and Yahoo is ending next month, I thought this was great timing on Richard’s part. But sometimes, Lync admins can’t login to SQL servers to run queries due to security policy. Plus, the query is something you’d have to keep handy and edit accordingly each time you wanted to get data. So I figured – hey, why not whip up a quick script to allow an admin to query SQL for this data, allowing for any domain and time frame to be specified? Poof – out comes my script.

This script will query a specific SQL server for information about a specific federated SIP domain. The domain does NOT need to be in the allowed domains list if you’re open federating. Any SIP domain name works. You can specify a start date/time in the yyyy-MM-dd format, such as 2014-05-13 using the -TimeSpan parameter. Or, you can use some handy ranges I’ve included, including LastWeek (the last 7 days), Last30Days, Last year (last 365 days), FirstOfYear or ThisYear (since Jan. 1), FirstOfMonth or ThisMonth (since the 1st of the month), FirstOfWeek or ThisWeek (since Sunday). Optionally, you can specify an end date/time in the yyyy-MM-dd format. This script will default to FirstOfYear with no end date, and aol.com for the domain. As we see below, only the SQL server holding the LcsCDR database is queried.

aol3

Now, from this output, we see that there is not a lot of communications with people on AOL since the first of the year. The upcoming change should have very little impact.

If you’re using a named instance in SQL, you can specify it as well.

The script outputs a full object, just like other cmdlets, so you can pipe it to other commands to alter the display, including sorting, or my favorite, Out-GridView, as well as outputting to files such as .csv.

Hopefully, this tool will make life a little easier in digging out data.

Syntax

Get-CsFederatedConversationDetails.ps1 [[-SqlServer] ] [[-SqlInstance] ] [[-SipDomain] ] [[-TimeSpan] <object>] [[-EndDate] <object>] [-WhatIf ] [-Confirm ] [<commonparameters>]</commonparameters></object>

Installation

Execution Policy: Third-party PowerShell scripts may require that the PowerShell Execution Policy be set to either AllSigned, RemoteSigned, or Unrestricted. The default is Restricted, which prevents scripts – even code signed scripts – from running. For more information about setting your Execution Policy, see Using the Set-ExecutionPolicy Cmdlet.

Assumptions

None

Download

v1.0 – 05-13-2014 – Get-CsFederatedConversationDetails.v1.0.zip

Changelog

See the changelog for information on what’s changed/included in each version.

 

Changelog: Get-CsFederatedConversationDetails.ps1

This is the changelog page for Get-CsFederatedConversationDetails.ps1. You will find a complete list of released versions, their dates, and the features and issues addressed in each. Please refer to the script’s main page for more information including download links, installation details, and more.

v1.0 – 05-13-2014

  1. Initial version

Script: Get-CsUpdateVersion.ps1 – See the Cumulative Update Level Of All Lync Servers

May 2, 2014 17 comments

Description

My work at Modality Systems often has me doing health checks for customer Lync environments. These can be due to customer requests, or as part of our onboarding for new managed support customers. If you’ve ever had an Active Directory Risk Assessment Program (ADRAP) or Exchange Risk Assessment Program (ExRAP), it’s quite similar. Lots of tasks to run, lots of data to sift through. So it’s always beneficial to standardize and automate the steps to get the data. The same is the case when you’re responsible for your own environment and want to ensure good health.

Just like Get-CsDatabaseUpdateStatus.ps1, Dave Howe from the Lync product group and I teamed up to automate something. In this case, it’s looking at what Cumulative Updates are installed on each server throughout a Lync environment. This script queries each pool, then finds what servers are part of that pool, and queries each server to find the CU that’s installed. It then provides an easy to read output of the entire environment (with exceptions) for easy review. As shown below, we see three multi-server pools, the version number and “friendly” Cumulative Update info.

Get-CsUpdateVersion3

The script works fine with Standard Edition servers as well:

Get-CsUpdateVersion4

In the first example, you see that the first two servers show “PSRemoting failure”. This is because the script uses PowerShell Remoting to connect to each remote server to query information (see installation notes below). PSRemoting doesn’t really work the same when dealing with non-domain joined machines, such as the first two, which are edge servers. So the script isn’t able to communicate with them via PSRemoting, and flags them. If the script can’t ping a server, it will show as “offline”. The friendly name of the CU shown is coded in the script. So I’ll update it each time a new CU is released.

By default, the script checks all pools. But you can specify a single pool by using the -PoolFqdn parameter.

Syntax

Get-CsUpdateVersion.ps1 [[-PoolFqdn] ] [-WhatIf] [-Confirm] []

Installation

This script uses PowerShell Remoting to query remote servers. PSRemoting is enabled by default on Windows Server 2012 and later, but disabled by default on 2008 R2. To enable PSRemoting on 2008 R2 servers, see Enable-PSRemoting.

Execution Policy: Third-party PowerShell scripts may require that the PowerShell Execution Policy be set to either AllSigned, RemoteSigned, or Unrestricted. The default is Restricted, which prevents scripts – even code signed scripts – from running. For more information about setting your Execution Policy, see Using the Set-ExecutionPolicy Cmdlet.

Assumptions

None

Download

v1.9 – 02-19-2015 – Get-CsUpdateVersion.v1.9.zip

v1.8 – 02-09-2015 – Get-CsUpdateVersion.v1.8.zip

v1.7 – 01-01-2015 – Get-CsUpdateVersion.v1.7.zip

v1.6 – 12-12-2014 – Get-CsUpdateVersion.v1.6.zip

v1.5 – 11-21-2014 – Get-CsUpdateVersion.v1.5.zip

v1.4 – 09-24-2014 – Get-CsUpdateVersion.v1.4.zip

v1.3 – 09-02-2014 – Get-CsUpdateVersion.v1.3.zip

v1.2 – 08-07-2014 – Get-CsUpdateVersion.v1.2,zip

v1.1 – 06-02-2014 – Get-CsUpdateVersion.v1.1.zip

v1.0 – 05-02-2014 – Get-CsUpdateVersion.v1.0.zip

Changelog

See the changelog for information on what’s changed/included in each version.

Changelog: Get-CsUpdateVersion.ps1

This is the changelog page for Get-CsUpdateVersion.ps1. You will find a complete list of released versions, their dates, and the features and issues addressed in each. Please refer to the script’s main page for more information including download links, installation details, and more.

v1.9 – 02-19-2015

  1. Added Lync Server 2013 CU 11 (5.0.8308.871)

v1.8 – 02-09-2015

  1. Added Lync Server 2010 CU 15 (4.0.7577.710)

v1.7 – 01-01-2015

  1. Added Lync Server 2010 CU 13 (4.0.7577.707)
  2. Added Lync Server 2010 CU 14 (4.0.7577.708)
  3. Added Lync Server 2013 CU 10 (5.0.8308.866)

v1.6 – 12-12-2014

  1. Added Lync Server 2013 CU 9 (5.0.8308.857)

v1.5 – 11-21-2014

  1. Added Lync Server 2013 post CU5 (5.0.8308.803)
  2. Added Lync Server 2013 CU 7 (5.0.8308.831)
  3. Added Lync Server 2013 CU 8 (5.0.8308.834)

v1.4 – 09-24-2014

  1. Added Lync Server 2013 CU6

v1.3 – 09-02-2014

  1. Added Lync Server 2010 CU12

v1.2 – 08-07-2014

  1. Added script check for updates. This is key because each time a new cumulative update comes out, the script will be updated with version info
  2. Added some preliminary code around getting version info for OWAS servers. Need to find a graceful way of getting the server names in a OWAS farm.
  3. Added Lync Server 2013 CU5

v1.1 – 06-02-2014

  1. Tweaked the PSRemoting code block for retrieving version numbers per Chris Irons. This should resolve unexpected results when querying Lync Server 2010 pools.
  2. Filtered out “Debugging Tools” “Resource Kit Tools” “Best Practices Analyzer” and “Meeting Room Portal” which could have a higher version number and cause incorrect results – thanks to Andy G for pointing that out.
  3. Shortened some of the output text to reduce the likelihood of word wrap.

v1.0 – 05-02-2014

  1. Initial version

Script: Get-CsDatabaseUpdateStatus.ps1 – See If Your Lync Databases Are Up To Date

April 30, 2014 20 comments

Description

Anyone who has updated a Lync environment with a recent Cumulative Update knows that there are often manual steps to perform after the LyncServerUpdateInstaller.exe program is finished. These are often database update functions. And often, multiple functions to update the various different databases, including the CMS, monitoring, archiving, Persistent Chat, etc. I’ve run across quite a few environments where the LyncServerUpdateInstaller.exe is run, and nothing else is done, and the client can’t figure out why things aren’t running as they expect. Fortunately, the Test-CsDatabase cmdlet will show you the current version of the database and the expected version. But then you have to manually compare each one to determine if an update is required. Of course, there are databases on the local Front End server(s), and the SQL backend server(s). Also, it’s important to review the status of SQL mirroring, and ensuring that databases are active on the principal node and not the mirror node. And that’s just part of the patching process.

Dave Howe, of the Lync product group, and I collaborated on a script that helps streamline part of this process. Dave did a lot of the initial grunt work, so he deserves a lot of the credit. I cleaned things up and optimized per some best practices.

Among the tasks that this script performs:

Determines whether database updates are required. It performs the following checks:

  1. Detects whether the pool version is Lync Server 2013 or later
  2. Detects whether database mirroring is enabled
  3. Detects whether the primary and mirror SQL servers are online
  4. Detects whether the mirror server is principal for any databases
  5. Detects whether the local machine is a FE of the given pool
  6. Detects whether the CMS is on Lync Server 2013 or later

And returns the following info:

  1. Returns list of local databases, their versions, and whether a database update is required (if the local server is a member of the pool)
  2. Returns list of backend databases, their versions, and whether a database update is required
  3. Returns list of CMS databases, their versions, and whether a database update is required

An example output is shown below. Note that the local XDS database requires an update

Get-CsDatabaseUpdateStatus2

Syntax

Get-CsDatabaseUpdateStatus.ps1 [[-PoolFqdn] ] [-WhatIf] [-Confirm] []

Installation

Execution Policy: Third-party PowerShell scripts may require that the PowerShell Execution Policy be set to either AllSigned, RemoteSigned, or Unrestricted. The default is Restricted, which prevents scripts – even code signed scripts – from running. For more information about setting your Execution Policy, see Using the Set-ExecutionPolicy Cmdlet.

Assumptions

None

Download

v1.1 – 04-30-2014 – Get-CsDatabaseUpdateStatus.v1.1.zip

v1.0 – 04-30-2014 – Get-CsDatabaseUpdateStatus.v1.0.zip

Changelog

See the changelog for information on what’s changed/included in each version.

 

Changelog: Get-CsDatabaseUpdateStatus.ps1

April 30, 2014 Leave a comment

This is the changelog page for Get-CsDatabaseUpdateStatus.ps1. You will find a complete list of released versions, their dates, and the features and issues addressed in each. Please refer to the script’s main page for more information including download links, installation details, and more.

v1.1 – 04-30-2014

  1. Fixed an issue with mangled parameter blocks. Thanks to Dave for reporting it.

v1.0 – 04-30-2014

  1. Initial version

Module: ExchangeServices – Functions to stop/start/query Exchange services

April 1, 2014 2 comments

Description

Exchange 2013 logo 128x128Being someone who’s converted from Exchange to Lync, I have the luxury of cmdlets for managing Lync services. This includes starting, stopping, and querying those services. I’ve heard from a few Exchange guys who have said it would be nice if the Exchange guys had the same ability. Sure, you can manually type a PowerShell query each time, but why not convert that into some functions? I’ve created a module that has three functions in it. Start-ExWindowsService, which will start any Exchange service that is not disabled and not currently running. Stop-ExWindowsService will stop all running Exchange services. Get-ExWindowsService, which will display all Exchange services and their status and startup type. And finally, Set-ExWindowsServiceRecoveryOptions sets all Exchange related services to automatically restart in the event of a service failure.

 

Syntax

Start-ExWindowsService [[-ComputerName] ] [[-Name] ] [-WhatIf] [-Confirm] []
Stop-ExWindowsService [[-ComputerName] ] [[-Name] ] [-Force] [-WhatIf] [-Confirm] []
Get-ExWindowsService [[-ComputerName] ] [[-Name] ] [-WhatIf ] [-Confirm ] []
Set-ExWindowsServiceRecoveryOptions [[-ComputerName] ] [-WhatIf] [-Confirm]

Installation

Open PowerShell and type $env:PSModulePath. Note that it will generally include two paths. One is to c:\Windows\System32\WindowsPowerShell\v1.0\Modules\. Placing the module in this location will make it available to everyone who uses that computer. The other path is to a subfolder of your My Documents folder. Something like C:\Users\administrator\Documents\WindowsPowerShell\Modules. Placing the module in there will make it available just to you. In either case, unzip the contents of the zip file, including the folder, to the modules folder. One thing to note: if you place the module in your personal modules folder, it will not show in the list when you run Get-Module -ListAvailable. But it will still work fine. Import the module by typing Import-Module ExchangeServices

Download

v1.1 – 01-26-2015 – ExchangeServices.v1.1.zip

v1.0 – 04-01-2014 – ExchangeServices.v1.0.zip

Changelog

See the changelog for information on what’s changed/included in each version.

 

Categories: Exchange Server, PowerShell Tags:

Changelog: ExchangeServices

This is the changelog for ExchangeServices. You will find a complete list of released versions, their dates, and the features and issues addressed in each. Please refer to the script’s main page for more information including download links, installation details, and more.

v1.0 – 04-01-2014

  1. Original version
Categories: Exchange Server Tags:

New Syntax Highlighting and Auto-Complete Files for UltraEdit includes PowerShell v4, AD, Lync 2013, and Exchange 2013

March 12, 2014 Leave a comment

Syntax highlighting

Updated the wordfile a little bit. This one includes all previous functions as well as the following:

  1. PowerShell v4 cmdlets (the ones available when you open a new v4 session).
  2. Exchange 2013 SP1 cmdlets
  3. Lync 2013 cmdlets
  4. Active Directory cmdlets

That adds up to 2834 cmdlets/functions that get syntax highlighting on top of the 137 aliases that are also in the file. The file also has variable highlighting, as well as operators and comp operators highlighting.

Formatting changes include the following:

  1. code folding for (), so your long param() blocks can now be collapsed/expanded.
  2. code folding for region/endregion. This mimics the behavior of ISE.

If you’d like to change the colors and/or fonts used for highlighting, go to View>Themes>Manage Themes, as the styling in the wordfile is ignored starting with v20 of UltraEdit.

manage themes

As with all other wordfiles, they are stored in “%appdata%\IDMComp\UltraEdit\Wordfiles\”, unless you change the path in Advanced>Configuration>Editor Display>Syntax Highlighting.

wordfile path

You can optionally set the “Highlight new file as:” to PowerShell, as I do (also shown above).

As soon as you place this wordfile in that folder, you should see PowerShell as an option under View>View as (Highlighting File Type)

view as highlighting

Auto-complete

I’ve also created an auto complete file that contains the same cmdlet/function names as the syntax highlighting file. When enabled, you get tab completion of cmdlet and function names similar to the PowerShell console and ISE. Note, however, that in UltraEdit, you only get auto-complete of the cmdlet/function names, not their parameters.

You can save the file anywhere. Then, go to Advanced>Configuration>Editor>Word Wrap/Tab Settings to specify the location within UltraEdit:

auto-complete path

Then go to Auto-complete and check the box “Show auto-complete dialog automatically” and also enter a number in the box. 5 works for me.

auto-complete options

Now, when typing a cmdlet/function that’s in the auto-complete file, you’ll get suggestions.

auto-complete suggestions

Up/down errors navigate through the list, and tab uses the highlighted suggestion.

Download

UltraEditSyntaxHighlighingAuto-CompleteFiles.zip